laughingduckpermaculture:

Yesterday we started building a more permanent debris hut for the ducks. A former-boy-scout co-conspirator of ours helped us lash together some old fence posts and we bulked it out with downed walnut limbs, the ramial wood that was littering the yard, and grass clippings and scythed kochia. We’re not finished adding cover material on top, but we’ll keep working on it as we have time.

This one opens to about north-northeast. It catches a tiny bit of morning sun, while its back blocks our prevailing western winds and the lesser southern ones, and provides more much-needed shade in the afternoon.

Private Message me here if you’d like to seed swap via letter

livingwind:

My handle is George Lee. Vegetables, beneficial plant species.

http://www.permies.com/t/11200/resources/Seed-swap-letter

http://www.permies.com/t/40/21253/plants/Seed-Swap

Everything has it’s place in nature. While this isn’t directly related to horticulture, this is an amazing point of observation on the importance of biodiversity in ecosystems to both plant and animal life and how the two are vitally important to each other.

cathyashford:

Interesting juxtaposition… On the left is my neighbour’s field, farmed using traditional methods, apparently harvested yet still irrigating… On the right is our boundary, where I’ve cleared off the layers of chopped and dropped hedge trimmings…. Compare they grey, dead and dry clay to the beautiful, brown and alive soil on our side. We HAVE to protect our soil, or else it dies, the carbon dries up, and blows away to end up in the atmosphere :(
#permaculture #chopanddrop #agriculture #farming

cathyashford:

Interesting juxtaposition… On the left is my neighbour’s field, farmed using traditional methods, apparently harvested yet still irrigating… On the right is our boundary, where I’ve cleared off the layers of chopped and dropped hedge trimmings….
Compare they grey, dead and dry clay to the beautiful, brown and alive soil on our side. We HAVE to protect our soil, or else it dies, the carbon dries up, and blows away to end up in the atmosphere :(

#permaculture #chopanddrop #agriculture #farming

milkwoodpermaculture:

Permaculture Playing Cards

Hey look what just arrived at the Milkwood office – permaculture playing cards! These are great.
52 cards jam-packed with interesting knowledge and a sprinkling of permaculture people profiles – I can’t wait to kick back in the shade next week with these…

View Post

milkwoodpermaculture:

Permaculture Playing Cards

Hey look what just arrived at the Milkwood office – permaculture playing cards! These are great.

52 cards jam-packed with interesting knowledge and a sprinkling of permaculture people profiles – I can’t wait to kick back in the shade next week with these…

View Post

Under Cover Farmers

Fantastic feature showing commercial farmers in North Carolina learning the value and benefits of cover cropping.

It’s certainly not perfect. There are still fertilizers and herbicides being used, but they’re cutting back and it’s a wonderful step in the right direction. This is exactly the thing that any skeptic farmers doing things the ‘conventional’ way need to see.

New swales doing a fantastic job at the Survival Podcast Earthworks Seminar. This is a great example of what a swale looks like in place like this and just how quickly they can be extremely effective. The often-seen cutaway illustrations of swales are obviously useful, but it’s also nice to see a real-world example sometimes.

Permaculture magazine #77

Permaculture magazine #77

milos-garden:

Ok so this is my compost tea set up ! Pillowcase filled with compost in a very large water filled bucket (like 3 feet tall). Two air bubblers keeping it oxygenated/aerobic.Tons of added ingredients (these can be a bit hard to find…). Soil bacteria. Soil fungus. Yeasts. Probiotics. Fungus eating bacteria. Regular additions of molasses keeps everything fed and multiplying. Secret ingredient = humic acid. Applied this about two weeks back to a row of plants and already have seen a dramatic response in some species. A lead plant that had been struggling is now blooming. A tree had a massive spurt of growth. Pretty awesome.

milos-garden:

Ok so this is my compost tea set up !

Pillowcase filled with compost in a very large water filled bucket (like 3 feet tall). Two air bubblers keeping it oxygenated/aerobic.

Tons of added ingredients (these can be a bit hard to find…). Soil bacteria. Soil fungus. Yeasts. Probiotics. Fungus eating bacteria.

Regular additions of molasses keeps everything fed and multiplying.

Secret ingredient = humic acid.

Applied this about two weeks back to a row of plants and already have seen a dramatic response in some species. A lead plant that had been struggling is now blooming. A tree had a massive spurt of growth.

Pretty awesome.